I love reading the New York Times on my tablet.

I catch up on the local news every morning on Syracuse.com, the digital version of the Post Standard, at my desktop.

I don’t, however, like thinking about a future without the printed newspaper. When I really want to engage with the news, I pick up the paper. I’m a loyal subscriber to the Post Standard, and I will be until it carries my obituary.

Recent events in publishing and some news coverage last week made me wonder about which might come first – the demise of the printed newspaper or me. Assuming a fairly long timeline, I hope it’s me, but increasingly, the future of newsprint is looking gloomy.

It’s been well documented that newspapers are the official record of news and information. Even with all the cutbacks in newsrooms, newspapers still have the biggest and most experienced news gathering teams. They do more investigative work and have the ability to dive deeper on matters that need attention and understanding. Their opinion pages have been and continue to be the influential voices on societal issues. A strong editorial can still swing thought leader opinions and activate people to solve important problems.

Because of these truths, conventional wisdom is that the demise of the “paper” will be bad for the public relations business. It means one less place to generate clips for our clients. I sure don’t want to see that day come, but if it does, I see opportunity for public relations. At least for the organizations that are ready.

In my next post, I’ll explain what it takes.

Greg Loh is the managing partner of public relations and public affairs at Eric Mower + Associates, one of the nation’s leading independent marketing communications agencies. Views expressed here are his own and do not reflect the opinions of EMA.

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