Archives for posts with tag: Adweek

Recovery reports from Superstorm Sandy are heartbreaking. On Friday, as neighbors cleared properties that were battered by flooding on Staten Island, the bodies of two more storm victims were recovered in a home nearby. Like most who were spared the ravages of Sandy, my thoughts and prayers continue to be drawn to the thousands of people still suffering along the Atlantic Coast.

The recovery is revealing important learnings about emergency communications in the digital age. Major shifts in how people are accessing news and information means crisis plans need to be rethought.

Most public safety agencies and emergency planners have long advised citizens to tune to radio and television for the most current advisories before, during and after the storm. As with so many other things in the digital age, fewer and fewer people are turning there for news and information. An Adweek Data Points last month showed that while television is still the leading source of news for Americans, 39% of the people who were asked, “Where did you get the news yesterday?,” responded  desktop and mobile devices versus 33% for radio.

At Eric Mower + Associates, preparations for Sandy gave us the opportunity to test our new emergency communications system. During the past year, the agency completed a comprehensive update of the our emergency plan, including the creation of a new employee notification system called EMAlert.  We could no longer accept the risk that an emergency situation that cripples our information technology system could also cut off communications to our staff. We worked with a world-leading provider of interactive and mass notification systems to ensure that the agency can now quickly and easily reach EMA people wherever they are with email, text and traditional phone messages. With a secure, offsite technology partner, we have greater assurance that we can help ensure the safety of our people and continue business operations in almost any type of emergency. EMAlert worked exactly as intended in our tests on the day Sandy arrived in the Northeast.

As the recovery from Sandy continues, I see three major lessons for communications professionals who have responsibility for emergency planning:

  1. Update crisis plans to address the reliance on mobile communications. Based on the size and scope of your organization, establish the right approaches (with built-in redundancies) to get messages to key stakeholders on mobile devices. For EMA, it’s a third-party mass notification system.  For your organization, it may be a simple “text-tree” supported by Twitter and Facebook messages.
  2. Maintain procedures that rely on traditional media outlets as a hedge against disruptions to mobile communications. Difficulties in restoring power and cell phone service quickly in hard hit areas can’t be ignored. A Saturday New York Times story, “Fractured Recovery Divides the Region,” carries a poignant reminder of that fact from a desperate Long Islander whose home was flooded. “I just keep waiting for someone with a megaphone and a car to just tell us what to do…I’m lost.”
  3. Closely monitor social media to debunk rumors and false information. Sandy brought many despicable examples of bad actors carelessly or deliberately sharing falsehoods during and after the storm. As exemplified by the good work of BuzzFeed’s Jack Steuf, though, it does appear that the social world can successfully “out” falsehoods and their perpetrators fairly quickly.

Superstorm Sandy shows us emergency plans that advise having battery operated radios and extra batteries on hand aren’t ready for the digital age. And with the near certainty that virtually every business will someday face a major disruption, now is the time to upgrade your preparedness.

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WARNING: This blog post includes vulgar language. Somebody else’s. Not mine. Avert your eyes from the image below if you are easily offended.

Slip ups in social media that create embarrassing – and sometimes damaging – consequences are all too common. Another one occurred last Friday affecting StubHub, eBay’s online marketplace for tickets to sporting events, concerts and shows. I read about it in Adweek, thanks to my colleague, Chuck Beeler, one of the leaders of EMA’s Social Media Advisory Group.

I’ll summarize the story, although it’s a bit like watching a rerun of one of your favorite old TV shows. You know how its going to end, but you love seeing it anyway.

At the conclusion of what must have been a very long week, a StubHub employee with clearance to manage the company’s Twitter feed, posted an exultant — but offensive — TGIF message:

“Thank fu_ _ it’s Friday! Can’t wait to get out of this stubsucking hell hole.”

Of course, this employee intended the declaration for a personal handle, but mistakenly released it on the official @StubHub Twitter feed reaching its 19,000 or so followers. Oops.

In his timely story the morning after, Adweek reporter Tim Nudd rightly noted that brand social managers must carefully switch between their personal and professional feeds: “Let’s all say it together: If you have access to a brand’s Twitter account, make sure you log out before posting an offensive personal tweet.”

Tim’s advice is sound, but I think it misses the bigger mistake that was made. What made the StubHub Tweeter think for one second that this disparaging post was a good idea even from a personal social media profile?

The critical message for public relations counselors is this: nothing is personal in social media.

This is especially true for front line social media managers, but I believe this reality goes well beyond that. If you have a career you care about or a company you are accountable to, forget any notion that what you do in social can be personal.

Accept this truth, and you’ll never need to worry if you picked the right profile in your HootSuite account when you upload a post. And you’ll surely avoid throwing a social hand grenade that bounces back at your company and you.

P.S. If you’re wondering how StubHub extracted itself from this social fiasco, they deleted the Tweet and acknowledged it in a follow up Tweet shown below. Good recovery. More posts like the first one, though, and StubHub might be able to start selling tickets to follow them on Twitter.

Greg Loh is the managing partner of public relations and public affairs at Eric Mower + Associates, one of the nation’s leading independent marketing communications agencies. Views expressed here are his own and do not reflect the opinions of EMA.

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